History 2017-05-24T10:46:42+00:00

History

“History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again.” – Maya Angelou

Welcome & Ethos

A high-quality history education will help students to gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. History helps students to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

In the history department, we aim to ensure that all students develop a love of history and are inspired in their learning. We want all students to achieve not only academic success, but ensure that they are equipped to thrive in their future education, training or career; in addition to making a positive contribution to society. We provide a range of opportunities within lessons and through additional trips and activities. These include visits to Berlin, the USA, local history field visits, in addition to working with experts in Holocaust Education and World War One historians.  We provide rigorous, challenging and inspiring teaching and learning opportunities.  The history teachers are overwhelmingly positive and enthusiastic about their subject and want students to enjoy it as much as they do!

Context of the Subject

The history department strives to ensure that students are fully equipped with the knowledge and skills that are essential for them to understand the world around them and be an active member of their community. They will acquire skills to apply in other areas of study and future employment. They will be encouraged to become independent thinkers who can generate their own opinions whilst empathising with the opinions of others. Students will learn how to evaluate information, reach substantiated judgements, clearly evaluate both sides of an argument in both verbal and written form, in addition to being able to research and report what they find. We promote the use of modern technologies to support learning and provide a broad historical knowledge that allows students to understand how events of the past continue to shape the world in which we live. Students will ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement.

Staffing Structure

Curriculum Leader
Miss B Speechley
Email: b.speechley@nunnerywood.worcs.sch.uk
Phone: 01905 363643

Team Structure
Curriculum Leader
Assistant curriculum leader
4 History Teachers

Curriculum Facilities

The department comprises of four specialist rooms, two of which have very recently been fully refurbished. All rooms are equipped with interactive white boards, projectors and facilitate the use of the latest multi – media learning technologies.  The department is very well stocked with a range of current resources and texts in addition to historical artefacts.

History – KS3

KS3 Description of the key skills, knowledge and understanding that are a prime focus of KS3 teaching in the subject area

Throughout Key Stage Three, students will develop their historical knowledge and skills to enable them to understand the world in which we live and how events of the past have shaped this.  Students are taught to engage in historical enquiry, debate and understand differing interpretations. They will question the past and will be able to effectively use evidence. Students will reach their own conclusions and develop an excellent knowledge of key events and people in a local, national and international context. Throughout Key Stage Three students develop transferable skills and are equipped to tackle GCSE history.

Organisation of the KS3 curriculum and how students are assessed (brief summary of long term plan of units and very approximate timings.

The Key Stage Three Curriculum course  an exciting journey through history, beginning with the Norman Invasion in 1066 and ending with the collapse of Communism in 1989.

Year 7 –  The Normans, Life in the Middle Ages, King John and the Magna Carta, The Black Death, Peasants’ Revolt, Immigration and Local History.

Year 8 –  The Tudors, The English Civil Wars, The British Empire and Slavery, The Industrial Revolution, The Extension of the Franchise, Social Change and the Welfare State.

Year 9 – World War One, Genocide, Weimar and Nazi Germany.

Students who opt for GCSE history will begin this course in Year 9. Those who do not will continue to study Modern World History, including World War Two and The Cold War

History – KS4

GCSE History Edecel 1-9 Code 1H10

KS4 Description of the key skills, knowledge and understanding that are a prime focus of KS3 teaching in the subject area

Throughout the course, students will develop their transferable skills that are essential to future study and employment. The aim of the course is to allow students to examine events that have shaped the world in which we live from the middle ages to the current day. The course teaches students to engage in historical enquiry and understand differing interpretations. They will question the past and will be able to effectively use evidence. Students will reach their own conclusions and develop an excellent knowledge of key events and people in a local, national and international context.

Organisation of the KS4 curriculum (brief summary of long term plan of units and very approximate timings)

Students will study four topics and will be assessed through three examinations taken at the end of year 11.

Topic 1 – Crime and punishment in Britain from 1000 to the present day. Explore how attitudes towards crime and punishment have changed over time. Examine how the modern police force and criminal justice systems developed. You will study case studies such as Jack the Ripper and Whitechapel, you will learn about how witches were punished and how the death penalty was abolished. This is a fascinating insight into how crimes and the punishments for them have changed over a wide time period.

Topic 2 –  Elizabethan England 1558 – 1588. Examine the problems faced by a female monarch running a country at this time. Learn how the Church had a big impact on society at this time and how Elizabeth fought off threats and challenges from home and abroad. Find out how people spent their leisure time and what education was available to them. Understand how the poor were treated and how England developed as a trading nation.

Topic 3 – Germany 1918 – 1945 Study the effects of World War One on Germany and how the country struggled to recover. Examine the stability of the Weimar years and its eventual collapse that paved the way for the Nazis to rise to power. Spend time studying how the Nazis impacted on all aspects of life in Germany.

Topic 4 – The Cold War. Take a fascinating journey through post war international relations and learn how the rise of the superpowers created a division both ideologically and physically, examine how close the world nearly came to nuclear war, learn how space travel, weapons and sport were all used as weapons in a battle of ideas and how the Berlin Wall finally fell and global tensions eased. Throughout this unit you will look at case studies and flashpoints that had the potential to end the world!

Assessment

Details re Assessment (number of examinations, weighting, components)
Key topic list per year group
All exams are taken at the end of Year 11. There are 3 exam papers.
Unit 1 30% Crime and Punishment and Historic Environment
Unit 2 40% Early Elizabethan England and The Cold War
Unit 3 30% Weimar and Nazi Germany