Computing & Business 2017-11-06T15:04:24+00:00

Computing & Business

“Everybody in this country should learn how to program a computer… because it teaches you how to think.” – Steve Jobs

Welcome & Ethos

  • The Computing and Business department encompasses many different subject disciplines; Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer Science and Business Studies.
  • Through these disciplines we aim to develop student’s capability, creativity and knowledge in computer science, digital media and information technology, to develop and apply their analytic, problem-solving, design, and computational thinking skills and to understand how changes in technology affect safety, including new ways to protect their online privacy and identity, and how to report a range of concerns.

Context of the Subject

Computer Science is the study of principles and practices that underpin an understanding and modelling of computation, and of their application in the development of computer systems. At its heart lies the notion of computational thinking: a mode of thought that goes well beyond software and hardware, and that provides a framework within which to reason about systems and problems. This mode of thinking is supported and complemented by a substantial body of theoretical and practical knowledge, and by a set of powerful techniques for analysing, modelling and solving problems.

Computer Science is deeply concerned with how computers and computer systems work, and how they are designed and programmed. Students studying computing gain insight into computational systems of all kinds, whether or not they include computers. It allows us to solve problems, design systems and understand the power and limits of human and machine intelligence. It is a skill that empowers, and that all Students should be aware of and have some competence in. Furthermore, students who can think computationally are better able to conceptualise and understand computer-based technology, and so are better equipped to function in modern society.

Computer Science is a practical subject, where invention and resourcefulness are encouraged. Students are expected to apply the academic principles they have learned to the understanding of real-world systems, and to the creation of purposeful artefacts. This combination of principles, practice, and invention makes it an extraordinarily useful and an intensely creative subject, suffused with excitement, both visceral (“it works!”) and intellectual (“that is so beautiful”).

In Business Studies students will consider the practical application of business concepts. The department provide opportunities to explore theories and concepts in the most relevant way, through the context of events in the business and economic world.

The knowledge and skills gained from this will provide students with a firm foundation for further study or life skills that may become invaluable.

Staffing Structure

Curriculum Leader
Mr A Jenkinson
Email: a.jenkinson@nunnerywood.worcs.sch.uk
Phone: 01905 363667

Team Structure
Curriculum leader
Assistant Curriculum Leader
1 teacher of Computing & Business
1 part-time Computing & Business

Curriculum Facilities

3 designated computer suites holding 32 PC’s. The department also has limited access to 30 PC’s in the library and 30 PC’s in D&T Dept.

All computers are on a cycle of renewal to ensure computers and their software remain cutting edge.

KS3

KS3 Description of the key skills, knowledge and understanding that are a prime focus of KS3 teaching in the subject area

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and
creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with
mathematics, science, and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural
and artificial systems. The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are
taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to
put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and
understanding, pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programs,
systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally
literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information
and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active
participants in a digital world.

Organisation of the KS3 curriculum and how students are assessed (brief summary of long term plan of units and very approximate timings.

Year 7 – E-Safety, Flowol, Introduction to Programming Kodu &Scratch, Understanding Computers, Programming the BBC MicroBit
Year 8 – E-Safety, App Inventor, Processing, Introduction to Python, Spreadsheets
Year 9 – Computer Crime & Cyber Security, Next Steps Python, Graphics, HTML, Dreamweaver

Sources of information that may be useful

www.teach-ict.com
http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize
www.hourofcode.com/learn/
https://www.codecademy.com/learn/python

KS4

KS4 Overview -repeated for each GCSE in the department and each year
From September 2017
Please be clear if there is a different course for year 10 and year 11

Subject title, board and syllabus code

GCSE Computer Science OCR J276

KS4 Description of the key skills, knowledge and understanding that are a prime focus of KS4 teaching in the subject area

Computer Science brings with it a range of theoretical and practical skills that examine how computers work and how programs are planned and written. Although computers are used for processing data and information, the study of Computer Science looks at creating such processes from scratch. This includes using a range of programming language to solve problems, however it is the solving of such problems that encompasses the main focus in the subject. Computational thinking (the ability to ‘think like a computer’ and formulating effective solutions to problems) is a key skill that learners will grasp during the study of Computer Science. The creation and understanding of algorithms to plan code and the ability to decompose problems down into smaller steps is a key part of understanding computer programming
The GCSE also combines sciences and mathematics to convert between binary values and grasp key concepts of computer hardware and software. How do hardware and software communicate? How does a CPU understand numbers, characters, images and sound? How do computers communicate with each other over networks and the internet? Issues around cyber security and prevention are also studied, looking at a range of threats to computer systems and how to tackle them.

Organisation of the KS4 curriculum (brief summary of long term plan of units and very approximate timings)

The course begins with learning key concepts of programming and algorithms. This includes creating algorithms to solve particular programs and then implementing these in a programming language. Intertwined with this theoretical concepts of computing are covered in preparation for the Computer Systems exam.
Throughout the two years, learners will become competent coders who are able to break problems down into smaller steps, plan how to solve these problems and solve them effectively in a programming language. Much of the development that takes place focuses on ‘thinking’ how to go about creating these solutions to develop strong computational thinkers.

Assessment

Details re Assessment (number of examinations, weighting, components)
Key topic list per year group

Students sit two examinations at the end of Year 11 and will also complete a 20 hour programming task controlled assessment.
• Computer Systems Examination – 1 hour 30 minutes (40% of GCSE)
• Computational thinking, algorithms and programming – Examination – 1 hour 30 minutes (40% of GCSE)
• Programming project – 20 hours (20% of GCSE)

Sources of information that may be useful

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqM1djlGhjw97sTW2kVN11aSi9sHuaZqo
http://www.cambridgegcsecomputing.org/
http://www.teach-ict.com/gcse_computing/ocr/GCSE_A451_topics.html
http://www.sqlzoo.net

KS4

KS4 Overview -repeated for each GCSE in the department and each year
From September 2017
Please be clear if there is a different course for year 10 and year 11

Subject title, board and syllabus code

AQA GCSE Business (8132)

KS4 Description of the key skills, knowledge and understanding that are a prime focus of KS4 teaching in the subject area

In Business learners apply their knowledge and understanding to different business contexts ranging from small enterprises to large multinationals and businesses operating in local, national and global contexts. They develop an understanding of how these contexts impact on business behaviour.

Learners will apply their knowledge and understanding to business decision making including:
• the interdependent nature of business activity, influences on business, business operations, finance, marketing and human resources, and how these interdependencies underpin business decision making
• how different business contexts affect business decisions
• the use and limitation of quantitative and qualitative data in making business decisions.
Our specification requires students to draw on the knowledge and understanding to:
• use business terminology to identify and explain business activity
• apply business concepts to familiar and unfamiliar contexts
• develop problem solving and decision making skills relevant to business
• investigate, analyse and evaluate business opportunities and issues
• make justified decisions using both qualitative and quantitative data including its selection,
interpretation, analysis and evaluation, and the application of appropriate quantitative skills.

Organisation of the KS4 curriculum (brief summary of long term plan of units and very approximate timings)

Learners will study the following units throughout Years 10 and 11:
1 Business in the real world
2 Influences on business
3 Business operations
4 Human resources
5 Marketing
6 Finance

Assessment

Paper 1: Influences of operations and HRM on business activity
What’s assessed:
• Business in the real world
• Influences on business
• Business operations
• Human resources
How it’s assessed
• Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
• 90 marks
• 50 % of GCSE
Questions
• Section A has multiple choice questions and short answer questions worth 20 marks.
• Section B has one case study/data response stimuli with questions worth approximately 34 marks.
• Section C has one case study/data response stimuli with questions worth approximately 36 marks.

Paper 2: Influences of marketing and finance on business activity
What’s assessed
• Business in the real world
• Influences on business
• Marketing
• Finance
How it’s assessed
• Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
• 90 marks
• 50 % of GCSE
Questions
• Section A has multiple choice questions and short answer questions worth 20 marks.
• Section B has one case study/data response stimuli with questions worth approximately 34 marks.
• Section C has one case study/data response stimuli with questions worth approximately 36 marks.

Sources of information that may be useful

http://www.businessed.co.uk
http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zpsvr82